Buildings

The Griffith Drive Building

The Griffith Drive BuildingThe Griffith Drive Building is located at 4755 SW Griffith Avenue.

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (stimulus funds), the City conducted energy efficiency upgrades on two HVAC units. This includes installing economizers that will stagger the start and stop times on the units to eliminate a large draw of electricity at one time. The City is also adding occupancy sensors to the restrooms and large work spaces and replacing the parking lot lights at The Griffith Drive Building with high efficiency LED lighting.

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The Beaverton Round/Westgate property

Located adjacent to the eight acre mixed-use Beaverton Round development and the Beaverton Central light rail stop, the Westgate’s 3.94 prime acres are a key site for the City’s goal to create a new, sustainable, urban center. The property is jointly owned by Metro and the City.

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Beaverton Operations Center

Operations Center - 9600 SW Allen Blvd.

This complex of four buildings is nestled between the banks of Fanno Creek and Scholls Ferry Road in East Beaverton. Constructed in the late 1970s, the center is comprised of the Administration Building, the City’s Fleet Garage, and two other buildings to support the public works equipment and staff for the City.

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (stimulus funds), the City is doing energy efficiency upgrades on HVAC units. The City is also replacing the parking lot lights at the Operations Center with high efficiency LED lighting.

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Beaverton City Library

Completed and dedicated in September of 2000, the Beaverton City Library is a treasure house of books, magazines, newspapers, CDs, CD-ROMs, DVD, videos, cassettes, books-on-tape, and computer databases. The Library provides space for children and young adults, and also rooms designated for computer use, business information, periodicals, and local history.

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (stimulus funds), the City is providing tune-ups to the controls that run the chiller and boiler units in addition to replacing four pump motors with high efficiency motors.
Map showing location of Beaverton Library (PDF)

Community Center

The Community Center provides approximately 10,000 square feet of affordable meeting space for various community groups.
Map showing location of Community Center (PDF)

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Weatherization

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (stimulus funds), the City is offering weatherization loans to Beaverton homeowners of all income levels. This program started in 2010.

Learn more: Hope-4-Homes

Photo Copyright © 2009 Conservation Services Group. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

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Solar

Solar Beaverton Program

home with solar panels on roofThis sun represents one or more Beaverton houses that installed solar panels through the Solar Beaverton program. The electricity generated by solar panels on Beaverton homes is used where it is produced. If it is not needed, it goes back to the grid and flows to nearby homes that demand electricity. To learn more about Solar Beaverton, visit www.solarbeaverton.org.

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Beaverton Activities Center

Renewable Energy Project: The City of Beaverton added a 1-kilowatt solar array to the roof of its Activities Center to encourage residents to make the switch to green power.

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (stimulus funds), the City is doing energy efficiency upgrades such as HVAC, hot water heaters, on many City buildings.

Beaverton Activities Center is located at corner of Allen and Hall Blvd.

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Library Solar

Beaverton City Library with solar array on the roofThe City installed a 17.6 kW solar array on top of the City’s main library in April 2012. The system was paid for by federal stimulus funds through the Energy Conservation Block Grants Program through the Department of Energy. The array will generate electricity and be fed back into the grid. The city will be paid $0.39 per kWh it generates. The entire project is estimated to produce over $100,000 in revenue over 15 years and will reduce Greenhouse gas emissions by 11.8 Metric Tonnes.

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Community Gardens

Community Center Gardens

Beaverton’s Community Garden Program promotes and provides gardening opportunities at sites for the physical and social benefit of the residents of Beaverton. Community Garden participants grow vegetables, flowers and small fruit plants. The City currently has two permanent sites and one temporary garden site.

Our two permanent sites are the Community Center Gardens and the Welch-Centennial Gardens. Our temporary site is the Kennedy Garden and is operated on a year-by-year basis.

Map to Community Center Gardens at 5th and Hall

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Kennedy Gardens

Beaverton’s Community Garden Program promotes and provides gardening opportunities at sites for the physical and social benefit of the residents of Beaverton. Community Garden participants grow vegetables, flowers and small fruit plants. The City currently has two permanent sites and one temporary garden site.

Our two permanent sites are the Community Center Gardens and the Welch-Centennial Gardens. Our temporary site is the Kennedy Garden and is operated on a year-by-year basis.

Map to Kennedy Gardens at 103rd & Kennedy

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Welch-Centennial Community Gardens

Beaverton’s Community Garden Program promotes and provides gardening opportunities at sites for the physical and social benefit of the residents of Beaverton. Community Garden participants grow vegetables, flowers and small fruit plants. The City currently has two permanent sites and one temporary garden site.

Our two permanent sites are the Community Center Gardens and the Welch-Centennial Gardens. Our temporary site is the Kennedy Garden and is operated on a year-by-year basis.

Map to Welch-Centennial Community Gardens 10th and Erickson

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Green Streets

Public Plaza @ Lombard/Broadway

The new commuter plaza on Lombard street near Beaverton Hillsdale Highway features Evolution Ultimate™ Architectural Pervious Concrete. City leaders selected Ultimate™ APC because it is earth friendly and looks great. This fine aggregate pervious concrete is the latest innovation from Evolution Paving Resources.

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Beaverton Operations Center, Upper Yard

City of Beaverton initiated innovative efforts in which low impact development and “green” infrastructure technology were incorporated into the design to increase temporary storage and employee parking while eliminating the need for conventional underground storm drainage infrastructure.

The “green” infrastructure features being tested include: Pervious concrete, Vegetative Drainage Swale, and Gravelpave. Anticipated benefits of these features are reduced storm water runoff volumes, enhanced groundwater recharge, and storm water pollutant reduction.

The Beaverton Operations Center is at 9600 SW Allen Boulevard (follow signs for Visitors by taking the first left from the driveway into the front parking lot and follow it straight to the end).

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7th Street Utility Improvement Project

The City of Beaverton and the 7th Street neighborhood worked together to incorporate environmentally friendly “green” construction concepts into the 7th Street Improvement Project. Tetra Tech, an engineering consultant, provided help with the design. “Green” concepts built into the project include the following essential elements: Street-Side Rain Gardens, Curb Cuts, and Pervious Sidewalks. The street-side rain gardens are the highlight of the project’s environmentally friendly design. They collect storm runoff from the street and allow it to filter through the vegetation and into the soil, providing a natural process for removing roadway pollutants from the water.

Project spans from 7th Street at Lombard Blvd. to 7th Street at Alger Avenue

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155th Avenue Green Streets Pilot Project

pervious concrete sampleThe City of Beaverton worked with Clean Water Services to provide a project to demonstrate and compare low impact design “green” concepts to standard development practices. These ”green” concepts include: Pervious sidewalks, Curb Cuts, Vegetative Drainage Swale, and Check Dams. Curbs provide stability to the road structure while the curb “V” cuts allow street runoff to enter the swale. Sweeping is a vital part of water quality, picking up street pollutants before they can enter the Storm Drainage System. Curbs assist when sweeping by trapping the debris before it enters the Storm Drainage System.

The pervious concrete sidewalk is directly across from SW Middleton Road on SW 155th Avenue

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Laurelwood Swales

Laurelwood swaleIn the summer of 2010 D&D Concrete & Utilities completed the construction of approximately ½ mile of curb and sidewalk on Laurelwood Avenue from Beaverton Hillsdale Highway to Birchwood Road and on 87th Avenue from Birchwood Road to Canyon Road at a cost of $420,936. The work was funded by both federal Economic Stimulus dollars and City street fund dollars.

The sidewalk work also included curbside swales with plantings. The idea is for the storm water in low intensity storm events to be diverted from the curbline to the swales and deposit contaminants in the swale before the storm water gets to Hall Creek.

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150th Court Rain Garden

150th Court rain gardenDue to excessive groundwater seepage the street was crumbing apart. The City combined the use of pervious concrete and a rain garden to manage groundwater seepage, provide water quality and to provide traffic calming with the constructed curb extension.

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Cedar Hills Park Middle School Rain Garden
(City / CWS Partnered Project)

students building rain garden at Cedar Hills Park Middle SchoolDesign, location, and planting of the storm water planters were a combined effort between Cedar Park Middle School students and staff, the Beaverton School District, City of Beaverton and Clean Water Services. Students created landscape plans for each of the planters and will participate in planting the planters and creating the interpretive sign.

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Conestoga Pervious Sidewalk
(between Robbins Drive and Welch Terrace)

pervious sidewalk274 LF of pervious concrete sidewalk was installed to resolve the problem with tree roots lifting the sidewalk and causing trip hazards. Drainage rock (¾ inch without fines) is used to maximize drainage and provide a base for the pervious concrete.

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6th Street
(between Erickson Ave and Menlo Dr)

gravel swale on 6th StreetDepaved, asphalt, right of way (ROW) and created gravel swales for storm water drainage. Added landscaped areas behind the existing speed humps. Constructed flush rolled curb extensions and rain garden at Fairmount.

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5th Street Sustainable Sidewalk Project
(near intersection of 5th St and Alger Ave)

Public Works and Community and Economic Development - Sustainability Department joined together to design and fund the 5th Street Sidewalk project. The purpose of this project was to replace lifted sidewalk panels due to tree roots. The City came up with sustainable approaches to repurpose the concrete sidewalk, incorporate water quality bioswales and native plants.

The concrete sidewalk from this site was removed and repurposed as masonry blocks to build a retaining wall. This prevented the city from having to purchase new materials and eliminated disposal. And lastly, in lieu of purchasing new dirt for the stabilization of the retaining wall, city staff reused the excavated dirt from on-site.

The city of Beaverton continuously searches for ways to incorporate low impact and sustainable design that are both cost-effective and provide for a community green space.

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Street Lights

Energy Efficient Street Lights

As part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (ARRA stimulus funds), the City is changing street lights to LED technology in various parts of the City. LED street lights can reduce energy consumption by over 50%. The City will take the resultant cost savings and use the funds to continue to purchase additional LED street lights.

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Transportation

City of Beaverton Vehicles

The City of Beaverton uses biodiesel to fuel several vehicles in its fleet. The use of biodiesel results in substantial reduction of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. In addition, the exhaust emissions of sulfur oxides and sulfates (major components of acid rain) from biodiesel are essentially eliminated compared to diesel. The use of biodiesel decreases the accumulation of smog and ozone in our atmosphere.

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Public Electric Vehicle Charging Stations at Beaverton Library

Electric vehicle charging stations at Beaverton City LibraryGazebo with solar panelsOn June 30, 2011, three electric vehicle charging stations were installed at the Beaverton City Library parking lot, across from the Beaverton Farmers Market. These installations were part of The EV Project, a grant with ECOtality and the US Department of Energy. The EV Project is the largest deployment of electric vehicles and charge infrastructure in U.S. history with plans to deploy 14,000 charging stations in over 18 cities in the U.S. To learn more check out www.theevproject.com

A gazebo with solar panels (known as the “Hot House”) was also installed in the library parking lot this summer. The Hot House was donated to the City by LiveLight Energy and SolarWorld. It serves as a community booth to engage farmer's market attendees in sustainability and health living topics. An exciting feature of the Hot House is that the solar panels provide the power for the three nearby electric vehicle charging stations. The Hot House represents the community partnerships created throughout the Solar Beaverton program, the largest collaborative residential solar project in the state.

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Electric Vehicle Charging Station

Mayor Doyle drives up to EV charging station in all-electric Smart CarThe City intends to install two electric vehicle charging stations near the Central Plant, in support of green technology and emissions reduction through the use of alternative transportation.

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Electric Vehicle Charging Stations at The Griffith Drive Building

Electric vehicle charging station at The Griffith Drive BuildingLocal governments across Oregon are installing electric vehicle charging stations at many city buildings. These installations support new technologies and provide consistent locations to find charging stations. There are now two EV charging stations on the north side of The Griffith Drive Building. These stations were installed as part of The EV Project, a grant of ECOtality and the US Department of Energy. The EV Project is the largest deployment of electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in history with plans to deploy 14,000 charging stations in over 18 US cities. To learn more check out www.theevproject.com.

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Tree Planting

Native Tree Planting, Murrayhill Recreation Association
(near Teal Blvd and 155th Ave)

The City teamed with the Friends of Trees and Murrayhill Recreation Association along with 111 volunteers to plant 1250 Native plants.

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155th Ave Swale Project
(near intersection of 155th Ave and Sexton Mountain Dr.)

This project created 300 lineal feet of open channel with associated plantings to replace 300 feet of piped storm water. This is not a “rain garden” but a stream creation that lends itself to promote more habitats for birds, wildlife and aquatic species, where a rain garden does not.

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Native Tree Planting, Water Quality Facility, Barrows Meadow
(near Scholls Ferry Rd and Loon Dr.)

In February, 2012 the City teamed with the Friends of Trees and 35 volunteers planted 1300 native plants at the Barrows Meadows Wetland. Landscaping debris is recycled into wood chips and used by the City’s Urban Forestry Division.

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Dawson Extension Swale

Main Avenue between 7th and 10th Street, rain gardens were installed by City staff. Rain gardens are environmentally sustainable infrastructure solutions to pollution and runoff reduction. The rain gardens also act as a traffic calming feature.

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Main Ave Rain Gardens

This project created 300 lineal feet of open channel with associated plantings to replace 300 feet of piped storm water. This is not a “rain garden” but a stream creation that lends itself to promote more habitats for birds, wildlife and aquatic species, where a rain garden does not.

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Green Projects in Beaverton

  • Buildings
  • Gardens
  • Green Streets
  • Solar
  • Street Lights
  • Tree Planting
  • Vehicles

click on the symbols below to learn more

  • The Griffith Drive Building
  • The Beaverton Round/Westgate property
  • Beaverton Operations Center
  • Beaverton City Library and Community Center
  • Weatherization
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Solar Beaverton
  • Beaverton Activities Center
  • Library Solar
  • Community Center Gardens
  • Kennedy Gardens
  • Welch-Centennial Gardens
  • Energy Efficient Street Lights
  • Public Plaza at Lombard and Broadway
  • Beaverton Operations Center, Upper Yard
  • 7th Street Utility Improvement Project
  • 155th Avenue Green Streets Pilot Project
  • Laurelwood Swales
  • 150th Court Rain Garden
  • Cedar Hills Park Middle School Rain Garden
  • Conestoga Pervious Sidewalk
  • 6th Street
  • 5th Street Sustainable Sidewalk Project
  • City of Beaverton Vehicles
  • Public Electric Vehicle Charging Stations at Beaverton Library
  • Electric Vehicle Charging Station
  • Electric Vehicle Charging Station at The Griffith Drive Building
  • Native Tree Planting, Murrayhill Recreation Association
  • 155th Ave Swale Project
  • Native Tree Planting, Water Quality Facility, Barrows Meadow
  • Dawson Extension Swale
  • Main Ave Rain Gardens

Questions about this Web application: webmanager@BeavertonOregon.gov